Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘internet freedom’

Internet freedom has been saved for now. Below is a statement by Federal Communications Commission Chairman and Corporate Plutocrat Tom Wheeler.

BUT FIRST, WHAT ABOUT THE TRANS-PACIFIC PARTNERSHIP? (TPP) AND WHAT ROLE MIGHT IT HAVE IN WHEELER’S DECISION?

Will there be an end run around Wheeler’s decision? The TPP is the most secretive international income and political power redistribution scam to ever come down the pike. There have been a few leaks, from which we know the TPP has nothing to do with trade. It’s mostly about rising prices on consumers, ending government regulations on Wall Street, and ending your right to vote on local and state levels on certain issues, such as health, safety and labeling laws. We don’t know if Internet freedom is on the table during the negotiations, but given that raising prices is a cornerstone of this agreement, and given that ending Internet freedom means raising the prices charged by Internet Service providers, well, perhaps you can see my point. BTW, raising prices redistributes income from your pocket to the pockets of rich corporate shareholders. In other words, in every way, the TPP is a massive income redistribution scam.

From Federal Communications Chairman and Corporate Plutocrat Tom Wheeler:

After more than a decade of debate and a record-setting proceeding that attracted nearly 4 million public comments, the time to settle the Net Neutrality question has arrived. This week, I will circulate to the members of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) proposed new rules to preserve the internet as an open platform for innovation and free expression. This proposal is rooted in long-standing regulatory principles, marketplace experience, and public input received over the last several months.

Broadband network operators have an understandable motivation to manage their network to maximize their business interests. But their actions may not always be optimal for network users. The Congress gave the FCC broad authority to update its rules to reflect changes in technology and marketplace behavior in a way that protects consumers. Over the years, the Commission has used this authority to the public’s great benefit.
Tom Wheeler

The internet wouldn’t have emerged as it did, for instance, if the FCC hadn’t mandated open access for network equipment in the late 1960s. Before then, AT&T prohibited anyone from attaching non-AT&T equipment to the network. The modems that enabled the internet were usable only because the FCC required the network to be open.

Companies such as AOL were able to grow in the early days of home computing because these modems gave them access to the open telephone network.

I personally learned the importance of open networks the hard way. In the mid-1980s I was president of a startup, NABU: The Home Computer Network. My company was using new technology to deliver high-speed data to home computers over cable television lines. Across town Steve Case was starting what became AOL. NABU was delivering service at the then-blazing speed of 1.5 megabits per second—hundreds of times faster than Case’s company. “We used to worry about you a lot,” Case told me years later.

But NABU went broke while AOL became very successful. Why that is highlights the fundamental problem with allowing networks to act as gatekeepers.

While delivering better service, NABU had to depend on cable television operators granting access to their systems. Steve Case was not only a brilliant entrepreneur, but he also had access to an unlimited number of customers nationwide who only had to attach a modem to their phone line to receive his service. The phone network was open whereas the cable networks were closed. End of story.

The phone network’s openness did not happen by accident, but by FCC rule. How we precisely deliver that kind of openness for America’s broadband networks has been the subject of a debate over the last several months.

Originally, I believed that the FCC could assure internet openness through a determination of “commercial reasonableness” under Section 706 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996. While a recent court decision seemed to draw a roadmap for using this approach, I became concerned that this relatively new concept might, down the road, be interpreted to mean what is reasonable for commercial interests, not consumers.

That is why I am proposing that the FCC use its Title II authority to implement and enforce open internet protections.

Thank You!

NOW, ABOUT THE TRANS-PACIFIC PARTNERSHIP! (TPP)

Will there be an end run around this issue? The TPP is the most secretive international income and political power redistribution scam to ever come down the pike. There have been a few leaks, from which we know the TPP has nothing to do with trade. It’s mostly about rising prices on consumers, ending government regulations on Wall Street, and ending your right to vote on local and state levels on certain issues, such as health, safety and labeling laws. We don’t know if Internet freedom is on the table during the negotiations, but given that raising prices is a cornerstone of this agreement, and given that ending Internet freedom means raising the prices charged by Internet Service providers, well, perhaps you can see my point.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

The movement to destroy Internet freedom is happening as you read this. Players from both major political parties are involved in making this happen. Let your congressional representatives know where you stand on this issue.

President Barack Obama knew precisely what he was doing when he nominated Tom Wheeler to head the Federal Communications Commission, and he was unanimously confirmed by the senate, which means that both major political parties are in on the fix against the 99 percent.

According to Wikipedia, Wheeler “…was appointed by President Obama and confirmed by the U.S. Senate in November 2013. Prior to working at the FCC, Wheeler worked as a venture capitalist and lobbyist for the cable and wireless industry, with positions including President of the National Cable & Telecommunications Association (NCTA) and CEO of the Cellular Telecommunications & Internet Association (CTIA).”

In other words, Wheeler is a charter member of the 1 percent with deep roots into the pockets of the Internet companies. The fix is in. Wheeler is planning on using the Internet as a conduit to redistribute income from the 99 to the 1 percent. Call the chairman, and let him know what you think about this rigged game.

Read Full Post »

I received the email below and decided to publish the complete thing. I should make a few comments about these revelations. The Trans Pacific Partnership negotiations are intended to redistribute income and wealth from the 99 to the 1 percent, and to push up corporate share prices. The parasites of the 1 percent are using these negotiations to rig the economic game against the 99 percent even more than it already has been. President Obama and his buddies, such as Wall Street Senators Ron Wyden and Mitch McConnell, are the epidemy of corrution and class warriers for the 1 percent  in Washington D.C. The Trans Pacific treaty aims to push up prices of goods, such as medicine. That will, naturally, lead to greater inflation.

Nov. 13, 2013

Contact: Peter Maybarduk (202) 588-7755 pmaybarduk@citizen.org<mailto:pmaybarduk@citizen.org>

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Secret documents published today by WikiLeaks and analyzed by Public Citizen reveal that the Obama administration is demanding terms that would limit Internet freedom and access to lifesaving medicines throughout the Asia-Pacific region and bind Americans to the same bad rules, belying the administration’s stated commitments to reduce health care costs and advance free expression online, Public Citizen said today.

WikiLeaks published the complete draft of the Intellectual Property chapter for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a proposed international commercial pact between the United States and 11 Asian and Latin American countries. Although talks started in 2008, this is the first access the public and press have had to this text. The text identifies which countries support which terms. The administration has refused to make draft TPP text public, despite announcing intentions to sign the deal by year’s end. Signatory nations’ laws would be required to conform to TPP terms.

The leak shows the United States seeking to impose the most extreme demands of Big Pharma and Hollywood, Public Citizen said, despite the express and frequently universal opposition of U.S. trade partners. Concerns raised by TPP negotiating partners and many civic groups worldwide regarding TPP undermining access to affordable medicines, the Internet and even textbooks have resulted in a deadlock over the TPP Intellectual Property Chapter, leading to an impasse in the TPP talks, Public Citizen said.

“The Obama administration’s proposals are the worst – the most damaging for health – we have seen in a U.S. trade agreement to date. The Obama administration has backtracked from even the modest health considerations adopted under the Bush administration,” said Peter Maybarduk, director of Public Citizen’s global access to medicines program. “The Obama administration’s shameful bullying on behalf of the giant drug companies would lead to preventable suffering and death in Asia-Pacific countries. And soon the administration is expected to propose additional TPP terms that would lock Americans into high prices for cancer drugs for years to come.”

Previously, some elements of U.S. proposals for the Intellectual Property Chapter of the TPP had been leaked in 2011 and 2012. This leak is the first of a complete chapter revealing all countries’ positions. There are more than 100 unresolved issues in the TPP Intellectual Property chapter. Even the wording of many footnotes is in dispute; one footnote negotiators agree on suggests they keep working out their differences over the wording of the other footnotes. The other 28 draft TPP chapters remain shrouded in secrecy.

Last week, the AARP and major consumer groups wrote to the Obama administration<http://citizen.typepad.com/eyesontrade/2013/11/38-million-retirees-say-no-to-a-trade-deal-that-would-make-medicine-more-expensive.html&gt; to express their “deep concern” that U.S. proposals for the TPP would “limit the ability of states and the federal government to moderate escalating prescription drug, biologic drug and medical device costs in public programs,” and contradict cost-cutting plans for biotech medicines in the White House budget.

Other U.S.-demanded measures for the TPP would empower the tobacco giants to sue governments<http://www.citizen.org/investorcases&gt; before foreign tribunals to demand taxpayer compensation for their health regulations and have been widely criticized<http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/23/opinion/why-is-obama-caving-on-tobacco.html&gt;. “This supposed trade negotiation has devolved into a secretive rulemaking against public health, on behalf of Big Pharma and Big Tobacco,” said Maybarduk.

“It is clear from the text obtained by WikiLeaks that the U.S. government is isolated and has lost this debate,” Maybarduk said. “Our partners don’t want to trade away their people’s health. Americans don’t want these measures either. Nevertheless, the Obama administration – on behalf of Big Pharma and big movie studios – now is trying to accomplish through pressure what it could not through persuasion.”

“The WikiLeaks text also features Hollywood and recording industry-inspired proposals – think about the SOPA debacle – to limit Internet freedom and access to educational materials, to force Internet providers to act as copyright enforcers and to cut off people’s Internet access,” said Burcu Kilic, an intellectual property lawyer with Public Citizen. “These proposals are deeply unpopular worldwide and have led to a negotiation stalemate.”

“Given how much text remains disputed, the negotiation will be very difficult to conclude,” said Maybarduk. “Much more forward-looking proposals have been advanced by the other parties, but unless the U.S drops its out-there-alone demands, there may be no deal at all.”

“We understand that the only consideration the Obama administration plans to propose for access to affordable generic medicines is a very weak form of differential treatment for developing countries,” said Maybarduk.

The text obtained by WikiLeaks is available at http://www.wikileaks.org/tpp&gt;. Analysis of the leaked text is available at http://www.citizen.org/access&lt;http://www.citizen.org/access&gt;.

More information about the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations is available at http://www.citizen.org/tpp&lt;https://hq-qz.salsalabs.com/salsa/include/fck2.5.1/editor/www.citizen.org

Read Full Post »

The Trans-Pacific Partnership, a new trade agreement that President Obama and his administration is leading the charge on is a lot of Asian countries except China. Vietnam is the low wage nation in the agreement, and so it is the pivotal nation, one in which 40 percent of Nike’s production occurs. That share is growing greater. Critics say, is going to increase corporate rights and decrease sovereign rights. Internet freedom is also at risk, so long as it doesn’t impact the share prices of companies such as Google. However, to minimize the ability of people to get honest news and views, non-corporate honesty in other words, the Obama administration most likely will attack Internet freedom. TPP is about redistributing income and political power from the 99 to the 1 percent.

Read Full Post »

Senator Ron Wyden, who is supposed to represent the people of Oregon, but who represents the 1 percent of people who use Wall Street to steal money from the 99 percent, is not happy with the latest income redistribution scam put forth by the Obama administration. That scheme seeks to redistribute more and more income from working people to the ultra wealthy.

The senator is the chairman of the senate subcommittee on trade. He is leading the charge against the scam, which is something of a miracle, but more of a coincidence, since he normally aids and abets such plots against the American people.

The Trans Pacific Trade Agreement (TPP) is being negotiated in secrecy, except for the 600 corporate lobbyists with access to the negotiators and a few members of congress. The negotiations involve twelve nations and it’s going to be bigger than Nafta. That’s a ton of income the Obama administration is planning to redistribute from working Americans to Wall Street.

Leaked documents show the pharmaceutical corporations want higher prices. Can you guess whose pockets they intend to pick when the TPP is enacted into law? Yours, or some other working stiffs somewhere. And then Big Pharma will take their higher prices, swell their profits, jack up their dividends and pump up their share prices. That’s how the extra money working stiffs will pay to stay healthy and alive will wind up in the pockets of the affluent. Think about it for just a moment.

The Obama administration is negotiating to jack up the price working people will pay to stay alive. That’s how the free trade income redistribution scam works. Your money or your life. Sounds like highway robbery to me.

Senator Wyden normally supports Wall Street in the rape and pillage of the 99 percent, especially via free trade scams. So what gives?

Wyden said, “The majority of Congress is being kept in the dark as to the substance of the TPP negotiations, while representatives of U.S. corporations — like Halliburton, Chevron, PhRMA, Comcast and the Motion Picture Association of America — are being consulted and made privy to details of the agreement.”

This statement explains a great deal. Wyden represents Google and other Internet firms. They are opposed to anything which would inhibit downloading and other things they do to make a profit. The movie industry and others don’t like this. The TPP could be a vehicle to go around Wyden and other supporters of Internet freedom. In this way, Wyden appears to side with the people of Oregon, whom he is supposed to represent, but whom he does not normally on economic matters, since he likes free “income redistribution” trade scam treaties. But his opposition to the secrecy of the TPP is a happy coincidence for the people of Oregon.

There is one other thing to note. The senator’s opposition is not to the TPP, but to it’s secrecy.

Related stories

Trans-Pacific Partnership: Key Senate Democrat Joins Bipartisan Trade Revolt Against Obama

Wyden's Statement Introduction of Congressional Oversight Over Trade Negotiations Act

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: