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Posts Tagged ‘real wages’

Home mortgage applications

To one my stories about how income had finally begun going up in 2016, somebody wrote, “Yes the 80 bucks more a month I’m getting now completely covers the hundreds of dollars my rent has gone up due to rich developers moving in and gouging us all.”

There are a few things to be said about the comment above. As you can tell by the graph above, applications for home mortgages peaked in 2005 and have dropped quite a bit since then. So why are home and rental prices still shooting through the roof?

The big banks in 2007-11 conspired together to keep over 50 percent of vacant houses off the market so as to jack up prices. Home prices have artificially risen since then. The banks have allowed an increasing dribble of these homes back onto the market as prices have artificially and illegally risen.

Rents are artificially high as well, and for the same reason. What the big banks have done is commit a crime called “a conspiracy in restraint of trade.” This collusion redistributes income from home buyers and renter (the 99 percent) to share and bondholders of the 1 percent.

90 to 95 percent of US population growth is due to immigration. When population constantly increases while large amounts of housing units are illegally taken off the market, the result jacks up housing prices and rents. See Shadow Inventory: More Houses Will Soon Be Available for Sale–Rismedia.com. See also The 7-Million Housing Shadow Inventory Could Trigger A Price Avalanche–Business Insider.

The government has changed the way it measures inflation twenty times since 1981 so as to reflect a lower rate of inflation than actually exists. This means real wages are actually higher than they would have been under the old methods of measuring inflation, so that when the government tells us wages have been stagnant for thirty-six years, it really means real wages have gone down significantly.

Meanwhile, increases in home and rental prices are not actually counted in the inflation rate. See How to Fix the Housing Component of CPI–Slate. Food and energy prices are not included either, but they used to be. There’s a reason for this; inflation measured against wage increases would demonstrate real US wages have plummeted over the last three and a half decades, rather than stagnated. Both Republicans and Democrats in public office don’t want you to know the real story, and neither does their corporate news media.

Both major political parties are controlled by big corporations, billionaires, hedge funds and Wall Street investment banks, and most of these benefit from this conspiracy in restraint of trade. So don’t expect the US government to do anything about this illegal manipulation of prices. It isn’t going to happen until we get honest government back to Washington.

Editor’s note;

The big banks have conspired against Federal law and supply and demand to withhold product from the market in order to manipulate prices and profits upward so it is the renters and buyers who are ripped off. Much, if not all, of this conspiracy has to do with mortgage backed bonds, and the profits and losses to be had from them. A loss in value of 8 percent in the housing that backs triple B rated bonds sends the value of those bonds down to zero, according to Michael Lewis in The Big Short. Likewise, he writes, a 20 percent slump in the price of housing sends the value of AAA home mortgage backed bonds to zero. A lot of billionaires and millionaire investors lose in this instance. So the big banks conspired to keep over 50 percent of the vacant housing off the market in order to prop up the value of those bonds. However, there are other significant benefits to those banks to keep houses off the market. Buyers and renters pay the price of this conspiracy because the obvious result of the actions of the big banks is to redistribute hundreds of billions, if not trillions of dollars, every year from the 99 to the 1 percent.

Dear Democrats, please note then President Bill Clinton refused to sign legislation that would’ve regulated derivatives. Home mortgage backed bonds are a derivative, since their value is derived from an underlying asset. That’s why they’re called derivatives.

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Federal Reserve Chairman Janet Yellen announced Wednesday, December 16 that the Fed will raise short term interest rates by .25 percent. That means interest rates are going to rise for the 99 percent; from 15 to 17 percent on credit cards, for example. Home mortgage rates, car loans, home equity credit lines, and student loans, among other loans, are going to rise. Home mortgage loans will rise from about 3 percent to roughly 5 percent.

Yet there are no signs of an inflationary spiral, which would in theory spur the Fed into raising rates, which is one of its falsely stated goals. Then there’s high (but not too high) employment, another cherished and false goal of the Fed. For the last six years the US economy has been creating less jobs every year (and with declining wages) than occurred under that alleged dreadful president, Jimmy Carter, whose four years as president also included rising real wages. Carter did this with an economy and population about half of today’s economy.

Preliminary indications are that the US is headed toward a recession deeper and longer than the last one, and we should arrive there somewhere between seven and seventeen months from now. The Fed’s actions exacerbate these indications by redistributing income from the 99 to the 1 percent, curtailing demand, and hurting the economy, such as a US durable goods sector that is clearly in recession. So what gives? What is the Fed up to?

Despite false statements to the contrary, the Fed actually has pretty much followed only two goals throughout its history, and its latest move is a classic example of this. One goal is to protect the profits and share prices of the big banks, and number two is to protect wealthy investors from their own bad investment decisions. Everybody else is expendable when the Fed undertakes its responsibilities. In other words, the 99 percent is expendable, and often the victims, of the Fed’s actions on behalf of its unstated goals, which is to financially protect the rich.

And so in this most recent Fed action, the Fed is doing its first duty; increasing the earnings and share prices of the big banks at the expense of the 99 percent, which makes it seem, quite accurately, that the relationship between the Fed/Big Banks and the 99 percent is akin to parasites unto their hosts.

Your higher credit payments are going toward greater bank profits, which will provide rising dividends to rich shareholders. Share prices might and should rise, at least in the short term. This is pure income redistribution, and the corporate propaganda network wants you to believe the Fed’s increase in interest rates is to stabilize the economy, or limit non-existent inflationary pressures, or who knows what. But the last thing the corporate press wants you to know is that more of your income is being redistributed by the US Federal Reserve Bank to the rich via higher bank profits, rising shares, and soaring dividends. The rich are going to get richer, and you are going to be more poor.

The ten biggest US banks have many things in common, and one of them is declining share prices since last summer. Clearly, the Fed’s action is intended to reverse the decline.

The ten biggest US banks are:

1 JP Morgan Chase
2. Bank of America
3. Citigroup
4. Wells Fargo
5. US Bancorp
6. Bank of New York Mellon Corporation
7. PNC Bank
8. Capital One
9. HSBC North America Holdings
10. TD Bank US Holding Company

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