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Posts Tagged ‘rent prices’

Home mortgage applications

To one my stories about how income had finally begun going up in 2016, somebody wrote, “Yes the 80 bucks more a month I’m getting now completely covers the hundreds of dollars my rent has gone up due to rich developers moving in and gouging us all.”

There are a few things to be said about the comment above. As you can tell by the graph above, applications for home mortgages peaked in 2005 and have dropped quite a bit since then. So why are home and rental prices still shooting through the roof?

The big banks in 2007-11 conspired together to keep over 50 percent of vacant houses off the market so as to jack up prices. Home prices have artificially risen since then. The banks have allowed an increasing dribble of these homes back onto the market as prices have artificially and illegally risen.

Rents are artificially high as well, and for the same reason. What the big banks have done is commit a crime called “a conspiracy in restraint of trade.” This collusion redistributes income from home buyers and renter (the 99 percent) to share and bondholders of the 1 percent.

90 to 95 percent of US population growth is due to immigration. When population constantly increases while large amounts of housing units are illegally taken off the market, the result jacks up housing prices and rents. See Shadow Inventory: More Houses Will Soon Be Available for Sale–Rismedia.com. See also The 7-Million Housing Shadow Inventory Could Trigger A Price Avalanche–Business Insider.

The government has changed the way it measures inflation twenty times since 1981 so as to reflect a lower rate of inflation than actually exists. This means real wages are actually higher than they would have been under the old methods of measuring inflation, so that when the government tells us wages have been stagnant for thirty-six years, it really means real wages have gone down significantly.

Meanwhile, increases in home and rental prices are not actually counted in the inflation rate. See How to Fix the Housing Component of CPI–Slate. Food and energy prices are not included either, but they used to be. There’s a reason for this; inflation measured against wage increases would demonstrate real US wages have plummeted over the last three and a half decades, rather than stagnated. Both Republicans and Democrats in public office don’t want you to know the real story, and neither does their corporate news media.

Both major political parties are controlled by big corporations, billionaires, hedge funds and Wall Street investment banks, and most of these benefit from this conspiracy in restraint of trade. So don’t expect the US government to do anything about this illegal manipulation of prices. It isn’t going to happen until we get honest government back to Washington.

Editor’s note;

The big banks have conspired against Federal law and supply and demand to withhold product from the market in order to manipulate prices and profits upward so it is the renters and buyers who are ripped off. Much, if not all, of this conspiracy has to do with mortgage backed bonds, and the profits and losses to be had from them. A loss in value of 8 percent in the housing that backs triple B rated bonds sends the value of those bonds down to zero, according to Michael Lewis in The Big Short. Likewise, he writes, a 20 percent slump in the price of housing sends the value of AAA home mortgage backed bonds to zero. A lot of billionaires and millionaire investors lose in this instance. So the big banks conspired to keep over 50 percent of the vacant housing off the market in order to prop up the value of those bonds. However, there are other significant benefits to those banks to keep houses off the market. Buyers and renters pay the price of this conspiracy because the obvious result of the actions of the big banks is to redistribute hundreds of billions, if not trillions of dollars, every year from the 99 to the 1 percent.

Dear Democrats, please note then President Bill Clinton refused to sign legislation that would’ve regulated derivatives. Home mortgage backed bonds are a derivative, since their value is derived from an underlying asset. That’s why they’re called derivatives.

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