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What happened to the link between wages and productivity? The rich received tax cuts under President Ronald Reagan. They used that money to corrupt government even more than it was, and to purchase legislation that redistributes income from the 99 to the 1 percent, such as privatization scams, free trade treaties, and more tax cuts, and they took the money from these things and purchased more of the same, including establishing a corporate, anit-US Constitution wing of the US Supreme Court. And that’s how wages and productivity were disconnected. The 1 percent rigged the political and economic game in their favor.

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“That giant sucking sound predicted by Ross Perot commenced 20 years ago last week. It is the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) vacuuming up U.S. jobs and depositing them in Mexico.

Independent presidential candidate Perot was right. NAFTA swept U.S. industry south of the border. It made Wall Street happy. It made multi-national corporations obscenely profitable. But it destroyed the lives of hundreds of thousands of American workers.

NAFTA’s backers promised it would create American jobs, just as promoters of the Korean and Chinese trade arrangements said they would and advocates of the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) deal contend it will. They were — and still are — brutally wrong. NAFTA, the Korean deal and China’s entry into the World Trade Organization killed American jobs. They lowered wages. They diminished what America cherishes: opportunity. They contributed to the very ill that President Obama is crusading against: income inequality. There is no evidence the TPP would be any different. American workers need a new trade philosophy, one that protects them and puts people first, not corporations.”

Click on the link below for the complete story.

Fast Track to Poverty–Huffington Post

 

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Income distribution from Mother Jones

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House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) canceled a planned speech about income inequality on Friday, after learning that his hosts at the University of Pennsylvania planned to make the event open to the public.

The speech, largely anticipated to be the first major Republican response to the rapidly growing 99 Percent movement, was being targeted by “Occupy” activists for a major march and rally. University officials planned to let the first 300 people in line attend the speech, and protesters had been waiting hours for that opportunity.

Rather than face them, Cantor canceled the speech just hours before it was to go on. His aides supposedly did not know it would be open to the public when he decided to give the speech, and they were worried the crowd would be almost entirely protesters.

In a stroke of luck, Cantor’s abrupt cancellation came just one day after the U.S. Social Security Administration said that 50 percent of U.S. workers made less than $26,364 last year. That detail would only seem to only add fuel to the protests, which largely cite the growing income disparity between rich and poor, and the corruption on Wall Street that led to the 2008 financial collapse.

Cantor has previously called 99 Percent activists “growing mobs” that want to pit Americans against Americans. In speech excerpts obtained by Politico, the Republican leader was apparently prepared to double down on that point.

“There are politicians and others who want to demonize people that have earned success in certain sectors of our society,” he was planning to say. “They claim that these people have now made enough, and haven’t paid their fair share. But, pitting Americans against one another tends to deflate the aspirational spirit of our people and fade the American dream. I believe that the most successful among us are positioned to use their talents to help grow our economy and give everyone a hand up the ladder and the dignity of a job.”

Cantor and virtually all congressional Republicans have adamantly resisted raising the wealthiest Americans’ tax rates, which are currently at historic lows in spite of a massive budget deficit and growing national debt.

The vast majority of Americans, and even a majority of Republicans, are in favor of asking the wealthy to share in the nation’s sacrifice — something President Barack Obama has proposed repeatedly, only to see his ideas shot down in Congress.

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Using the GINI index, the United States places 75th in terms of income equality among 126 nations. Denmark has the best income equality. Japan and then Sweden are next. The world’s hottest economy, Germany, rated 13th.

The United States rates right in the middle of the pack when it comes to income equality among third world nations. We’re ahead of the Philippines and Haiti, but behind Mozambique and Cambodia.

Every position staked out by President Obama has served to redistribute more income from working people to the wealthy. So income inequality is only getting worst. However, Republicans are even more adamant in redistributing income from the middle to the top. This process has been going on for thirty years since that great income redistribution advocate, President Ronald Reagan, the corporate drone.

If Obama is reelected president, the USA will probably drop to 78th or so on the list, just below Thailand. If a Republican becomes president, the United States middle class will see even more income and wealth redistributed to the top than if Obama remains president. That suggest we should vote for anybody but a Republican or a Democrat for president.

By now everybody knows free trade treaties redistribute income. Jobs are shipped overseas with these agreements. When this occurs, the rich receive the difference between the old employee compensation that was in the United States the new lower compensation paid overseas. The rich get their ill gotten gains via higher dividends and share prices. The job losers lose their income and benefits, which are transferred to the rich.

Now Senator Ron Wyden has voted to make things worse when he voted for the South Korea, Panama and Colombia. Congressman Blumenauer voted for the South Korea and Panama freely redistributing income from working people to the rich treaties. It shows something important about both Wall Street drones. They really don’t care about creating jobs. If Obama signs the treaty, then he is just playing politics with his jobs bill. But it should tell you that he is not serious about creating jobs. He’s just trying to rally his fading base. So he’s not serious about creating jobs at all.

Below is a list of the 126 nations from worst to best income equality.

SOURCE
Wikipedia: List of countries by income equality
DEFINITION
Economy Statistics > income equality > UN Gini index (most recent) by country
Share
VIEW DATA: Totals
Definition Source Printable version
Bar Graph Map

Showing latest available data. The worst income equality to the best.
Rank Countries Amount
# 126 Namibia: 74.3
Namibian Economy

# 125 Lesotho: 63.2
Basotho Economy

# 124 Botswana: 63
Motswana -Batswana Economy

# 123 Sierra Leone: 62.9
Sierra Leonean Economy

# 122 Central African Republic: 61.3
Central African Economy

# 121 Swaziland: 60.9
Swazi Economy

# 120 Bolivia: 60.1
Bolivian Economy

# 119 Haiti: 59.2
Haitian Economy

# 118 Colombia: 58.6
Colombian Economy

# 117 Brazil: 58
Brazilian Economy

= 116 South Africa: 57.8
South African Economy

= 115 Paraguay: 57.8
Paraguayan Economy

# 114 Chile: 57.1
Chilean Economy

# 113 Panama: 56.4
Panamanian Economy

# 112 Guatemala: 55.1
Guatemalan Economy

# 111 Peru: 54.6
Peruvian Economy

# 110 Honduras: 53.8
Honduran Economy

# 109 Argentina: 52.8
Argentine Economy

# 108 El Salvador: 52.4
Salvadoran Economy

# 107 Dominican Republic: 51.7
Dominican Economy

# 106 Papua New Guinea: 50.9
Papua New Guinean Economy

= 105 Mali: 50.5
Malian Economy

= 104 Niger: 50.5
Nigerien Economy

# 103 Malawi: 50.3
Malawian Economy

# 102 Gambia, The: 50.2
Gambian Economy

# 101 Zimbabwe: 50.1
Zimbabwean Economy

# 100 Costa Rica: 49.9
Costa Rican Economy

# 99 Mexico: 49.5
Mexican Economy

# 98 Malaysia: 49.2
Malaysian Economy

# 97 Madagascar: 47.5
Malagasy Economy

# 96 Nepal: 47.2
Nepalese Economy

# 95 Guinea-Bissau: 47
Guinean Economy

# 94 Philippines: 46.1
Philippine Economy

# 93 Uruguay: 44.9
Uruguayan Economy

# 92 China: 44.7
Chinese Economy

= 91 Cameroon: 44.6
Cameroonian Economy

= 90 Côte d’Ivoire: 44.6
Ivoirian Economy

# 89 Venezuela: 44.1
Venezuelan Economy

= 88 Nigeria: 43.7
Nigerian Economy

= 87 Ecuador: 43.7
Ecuadorian Economy

# 86 Turkey: 43.6
Turkish Economy

# 85 Hong Kong: 43.4
Hong Kong Economy

# 84 Nicaragua: 43.1
Nicaraguan Economy

= 83 Iran: 43
Iranian Economy

= 82 Uganda: 43
Ugandan Economy

= 81 Kenya: 42.5
Kenyan Economy

= 80 Singapore: 42.5
Singapore Economy

# 79 Burundi: 42.4
Burundian Economy

# 78 Zambia: 42.1
Zambian Economy

# 77 Thailand: 42
Thai Economy

# 76 Senegal: 41.3
Senegalese Economy

= 75 United States: 40.8
American Economy

= 74 Ghana: 40.8
Ghanaian Economy

= 73 Turkmenistan: 40.8
Turkmen Economy

= 72 Georgia: 40.4
Georgian Economy

= 70 Cambodia: 40.4
Cambodian Economy

= 69 Guinea: 40.3
Guinean Economy

= 68 Trinidad and Tobago: 40.3
Tobagonian Economy

# 67 Russia: 39.9
Russian Economy

# 66 Tunisia: 39.8
Tunisian Economy

# 65 Mozambique: 39.6
Mozambican Economy

= 64 Morocco: 39.5
Moroccan Economy

= 63 Burkina Faso: 39.5
Burkinabe Economy

# 62 Israel: 39.2
Israeli Economy

# 61 Mauritania: 39
Mauritanian Economy

# 60 Jordan: 38.8
Jordanian Economy

# 59 Portugal: 38.5
Portuguese Economy

# 58 Jamaica: 37.9
Jamaican Economy

# 57 Latvia: 37.7
Latvian Economy

# 56 Vietnam: 37
Vietnamese Economy

= 55 Azerbaijan: 36.5
Azerbaijani Economy

= 54 Benin: 36.5
Beninese Economy

# 53 New Zealand: 36.2
New Zealand Economy

= 52 United Kingdom: 36
British Economy

= 51 Lithuania: 36
Lithuanian Economy

= 50 Italy: 36
Italian Economy

# 49 Estonia: 35.8
Estonian Economy

# 48 Algeria: 35.3
Algerian Economy

# 47 Australia: 35.2
Australian Economy

# 46 Spain: 34.7
Spanish Economy

= 45 Laos: 34.6
Lao Economy

= 44 Tanzania: 34.6
Tanzanian Economy

# 43 Poland: 34.5
Polish Economy

# 42 Egypt: 34.4
Egyptian Economy

= 41 Ireland: 34.3
Irish Economy

= 40 Indonesia: 34.3
Indonesian Economy

= 39 Greece: 34.3
Greek Economy

# 38 Kazakhstan: 33.9
Kazakhstani Economy

# 37 Armenia: 33.8
Armenian Economy

# 36 Switzerland: 33.7
Swiss Economy

# 35 Yemen: 33.4
Yemeni Economy

= 34 Sri Lanka: 33.2
Sri Lankan Economy

= 33 Moldova: 33.2
Moldovan Economy

# 32 Belgium: 33
Belgian Economy

# 31 France: 32.7
French Economy

= 30 Canada: 32.6
Canadian Economy

= 29 Tajikistan: 32.6
Tajikistani Economy

# 28 India: 32.5
Indian Economy

# 27 Bangladesh: 31.8
Bangladeshi Economy

# 26 Korea, South: 31.6
Korean Economy

# 25 Romania: 31
Romanian Economy

# 24 Netherlands: 30.9
Dutch Economy

# 23 Pakistan: 30.6
Pakistani Economy

= 22 Kyrgyzstan: 30.3
Kyrgyzstani Economy

= 21 Mongolia: 30.3
Mongolian Economy

# 20 Ethiopia: 30
Ethiopian Economy

# 19 Belarus: 29.7
Belarusian Economy

# 18 Bulgaria: 29.2
Bulgarian Economy

# 17 Austria: 29.1
Austrian Economy

# 16 Croatia: 29
Croatian Economy

# 15 Rwanda: 28.9
Rwandan Economy

# 14 Slovenia: 28.4
Slovenian Economy

# 13 Germany: 28.3
German Economy

# 12 Albania: 28.2
Albanian Economy

# 11 Ukraine: 28.1
Ukrainian Economy

= 10 Finland: 26.9
Finnish Economy

= 9 Hungary: 26.9
Hungarian Economy

# 8 Uzbekistan: 26.8
Uzbekistani Economy

# 7 Bosnia and Herzegovina: 26.2
Herzegovinian Economy

= 6 Slovakia: 25.8
Slovak Economy

= 5 Norway: 25.8
Norwegian Economy

# 4 Czech Republic: 25.4
Czech Economy

# 3 Sweden: 25
Swedish Economy

# 2 Japan: 24.9
Japanese Economy

# 1 Denmark: 24.7
Danish Economy

Weighted average: 40.5

DEFINITION:

SOURCE: Wikipedia: List of countries by income equality
See also
Related links:

* Subscribe to our Economy feeds (stats: RSS / Atom, factoids: RSS / Atom)
* Save this page to del.icio.us / furl / your bookmarks

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CITATION
“income equality > UN Gini index by country”, Wikipedia: List of countries by income equality . Retrieved from http://www.NationMaster.com/graph/eco_inc_equ_un_gin_ind-income-equality-un-gini-index

Change citation style: APA MLA MHRA CSE AMA Chicago Bluebook Bluebook/JOLT
TOP ECONOMY STATS

* Big Mac Index
* Economic freedom
* GDP > PPP
* GDP > PPP (per capita)
* GDP per capita in 1973
* Gross National Income
* Gross National Income (per capita)
* Human Development Index
* Income category
* Poverty > Share of all poor people

QUIZZES

* income equality UN Gini in

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Using the GINI index, the United States places 75th in terms of income equality among 126 nations. Denmark has the best income equality. Japan and then Sweden are next. The world’s hottest economy, Germany, rated 13th.

The United States rates right in the middle of the pack when it comes to income equality among third world nations. We’re ahead of the Philippines and Haiti, but behind Mozambique and Cambodia.

Every position staked out by President Obama has served to redistribute more income from working people to the wealthy. So income inequality is only getting worst. However, Republicans are even more adamant in redistributing income from the middle to the top. This process has been going on for thirty years since that great income redistribution advocate, President Ronald Reagan, the corporate drone.

If Obama is reelected president, the USA will probably drop to 78th or so on the list, just below Thailand. If a Republican becomes president, the United States middle class will see even more income and wealth redistributed to the top than if Obama remains president. That suggest we should vote for anybody but a Republican or a Democrat for president.

By now everybody knows free trade treaties redistribute income. Jobs are shipped overseas with these agreements. When this occurs, the rich receive the difference between the old employee compensation that was in the United States the new lower compensation paid overseas. The rich get their ill gotten gains via higher dividends and share prices. The job losers lose their income and benefits, which are transferred to the rich.

Obama is pushing for more freely redistribute income treaties with South Korea, Colombia and Panama. This is supported by corporate drones, such as US Senator Ron Wyden and Congressman Earl Blumenauer. And we keep voting for these corporate bozos? Why?

Below is a list of the 126 nations from worst to best income equality.

SOURCE
Wikipedia: List of countries by income equality
DEFINITION
Economy Statistics > income equality > UN Gini index (most recent) by country
Share
VIEW DATA: Totals
Definition Source Printable version
Bar Graph Map

Showing latest available data. The worst income equality to the best.
Rank Countries Amount
# 126 Namibia: 74.3
Namibian Economy

# 125 Lesotho: 63.2
Basotho Economy

# 124 Botswana: 63
Motswana -Batswana Economy

# 123 Sierra Leone: 62.9
Sierra Leonean Economy

# 122 Central African Republic: 61.3
Central African Economy

# 121 Swaziland: 60.9
Swazi Economy

# 120 Bolivia: 60.1
Bolivian Economy

# 119 Haiti: 59.2
Haitian Economy

# 118 Colombia: 58.6
Colombian Economy

# 117 Brazil: 58
Brazilian Economy

= 116 South Africa: 57.8
South African Economy

= 115 Paraguay: 57.8
Paraguayan Economy

# 114 Chile: 57.1
Chilean Economy

# 113 Panama: 56.4
Panamanian Economy

# 112 Guatemala: 55.1
Guatemalan Economy

# 111 Peru: 54.6
Peruvian Economy

# 110 Honduras: 53.8
Honduran Economy

# 109 Argentina: 52.8
Argentine Economy

# 108 El Salvador: 52.4
Salvadoran Economy

# 107 Dominican Republic: 51.7
Dominican Economy

# 106 Papua New Guinea: 50.9
Papua New Guinean Economy

= 105 Mali: 50.5
Malian Economy

= 104 Niger: 50.5
Nigerien Economy

# 103 Malawi: 50.3
Malawian Economy

# 102 Gambia, The: 50.2
Gambian Economy

# 101 Zimbabwe: 50.1
Zimbabwean Economy

# 100 Costa Rica: 49.9
Costa Rican Economy

# 99 Mexico: 49.5
Mexican Economy

# 98 Malaysia: 49.2
Malaysian Economy

# 97 Madagascar: 47.5
Malagasy Economy

# 96 Nepal: 47.2
Nepalese Economy

# 95 Guinea-Bissau: 47
Guinean Economy

# 94 Philippines: 46.1
Philippine Economy

# 93 Uruguay: 44.9
Uruguayan Economy

# 92 China: 44.7
Chinese Economy

= 91 Cameroon: 44.6
Cameroonian Economy

= 90 Côte d’Ivoire: 44.6
Ivoirian Economy

# 89 Venezuela: 44.1
Venezuelan Economy

= 88 Nigeria: 43.7
Nigerian Economy

= 87 Ecuador: 43.7
Ecuadorian Economy

# 86 Turkey: 43.6
Turkish Economy

# 85 Hong Kong: 43.4
Hong Kong Economy

# 84 Nicaragua: 43.1
Nicaraguan Economy

= 83 Iran: 43
Iranian Economy

= 82 Uganda: 43
Ugandan Economy

= 81 Kenya: 42.5
Kenyan Economy

= 80 Singapore: 42.5
Singapore Economy

# 79 Burundi: 42.4
Burundian Economy

# 78 Zambia: 42.1
Zambian Economy

# 77 Thailand: 42
Thai Economy

# 76 Senegal: 41.3
Senegalese Economy

= 75 United States: 40.8
American Economy

= 74 Ghana: 40.8
Ghanaian Economy

= 73 Turkmenistan: 40.8
Turkmen Economy

= 72 Georgia: 40.4
Georgian Economy

= 70 Cambodia: 40.4
Cambodian Economy

= 69 Guinea: 40.3
Guinean Economy

= 68 Trinidad and Tobago: 40.3
Tobagonian Economy

# 67 Russia: 39.9
Russian Economy

# 66 Tunisia: 39.8
Tunisian Economy

# 65 Mozambique: 39.6
Mozambican Economy

= 64 Morocco: 39.5
Moroccan Economy

= 63 Burkina Faso: 39.5
Burkinabe Economy

# 62 Israel: 39.2
Israeli Economy

# 61 Mauritania: 39
Mauritanian Economy

# 60 Jordan: 38.8
Jordanian Economy

# 59 Portugal: 38.5
Portuguese Economy

# 58 Jamaica: 37.9
Jamaican Economy

# 57 Latvia: 37.7
Latvian Economy

# 56 Vietnam: 37
Vietnamese Economy

= 55 Azerbaijan: 36.5
Azerbaijani Economy

= 54 Benin: 36.5
Beninese Economy

# 53 New Zealand: 36.2
New Zealand Economy

= 52 United Kingdom: 36
British Economy

= 51 Lithuania: 36
Lithuanian Economy

= 50 Italy: 36
Italian Economy

# 49 Estonia: 35.8
Estonian Economy

# 48 Algeria: 35.3
Algerian Economy

# 47 Australia: 35.2
Australian Economy

# 46 Spain: 34.7
Spanish Economy

= 45 Laos: 34.6
Lao Economy

= 44 Tanzania: 34.6
Tanzanian Economy

# 43 Poland: 34.5
Polish Economy

# 42 Egypt: 34.4
Egyptian Economy

= 41 Ireland: 34.3
Irish Economy

= 40 Indonesia: 34.3
Indonesian Economy

= 39 Greece: 34.3
Greek Economy

# 38 Kazakhstan: 33.9
Kazakhstani Economy

# 37 Armenia: 33.8
Armenian Economy

# 36 Switzerland: 33.7
Swiss Economy

# 35 Yemen: 33.4
Yemeni Economy

= 34 Sri Lanka: 33.2
Sri Lankan Economy

= 33 Moldova: 33.2
Moldovan Economy

# 32 Belgium: 33
Belgian Economy

# 31 France: 32.7
French Economy

= 30 Canada: 32.6
Canadian Economy

= 29 Tajikistan: 32.6
Tajikistani Economy

# 28 India: 32.5
Indian Economy

# 27 Bangladesh: 31.8
Bangladeshi Economy

# 26 Korea, South: 31.6
Korean Economy

# 25 Romania: 31
Romanian Economy

# 24 Netherlands: 30.9
Dutch Economy

# 23 Pakistan: 30.6
Pakistani Economy

= 22 Kyrgyzstan: 30.3
Kyrgyzstani Economy

= 21 Mongolia: 30.3
Mongolian Economy

# 20 Ethiopia: 30
Ethiopian Economy

# 19 Belarus: 29.7
Belarusian Economy

# 18 Bulgaria: 29.2
Bulgarian Economy

# 17 Austria: 29.1
Austrian Economy

# 16 Croatia: 29
Croatian Economy

# 15 Rwanda: 28.9
Rwandan Economy

# 14 Slovenia: 28.4
Slovenian Economy

# 13 Germany: 28.3
German Economy

# 12 Albania: 28.2
Albanian Economy

# 11 Ukraine: 28.1
Ukrainian Economy

= 10 Finland: 26.9
Finnish Economy

= 9 Hungary: 26.9
Hungarian Economy

# 8 Uzbekistan: 26.8
Uzbekistani Economy

# 7 Bosnia and Herzegovina: 26.2
Herzegovinian Economy

= 6 Slovakia: 25.8
Slovak Economy

= 5 Norway: 25.8
Norwegian Economy

# 4 Czech Republic: 25.4
Czech Economy

# 3 Sweden: 25
Swedish Economy

# 2 Japan: 24.9
Japanese Economy

# 1 Denmark: 24.7
Danish Economy

Weighted average: 40.5

DEFINITION:

SOURCE: Wikipedia: List of countries by income equality
See also
Related links:

* Subscribe to our Economy feeds (stats: RSS / Atom, factoids: RSS / Atom)
* Save this page to del.icio.us / furl / your bookmarks

Compare countries:
Country 1:
Country 2:
Category:

CITATION
“income equality > UN Gini index by country”, Wikipedia: List of countries by income equality . Retrieved from http://www.NationMaster.com/graph/eco_inc_equ_un_gin_ind-income-equality-un-gini-index

Change citation style: APA MLA MHRA CSE AMA Chicago Bluebook Bluebook/JOLT
TOP ECONOMY STATS

* Big Mac Index
* Economic freedom
* GDP > PPP
* GDP > PPP (per capita)
* GDP per capita in 1973
* Gross National Income
* Gross National Income (per capita)
* Human Development Index
* Income category
* Poverty > Share of all poor people

QUIZZES

* income equality UN Gini index quiz

COMMENTARY
Post Reply

Ian
5th January 2011 Es posible encontrar un link donde registren los valores consecutivos del indice Gini?
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